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PraiseBuildings Articles

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A library of useful articles on every topic impacting your PraiseBuilding.


HIRING CONTRACTORS, SUBCONTRACTORS AND VENDORS

Finding a contractor who is capable of handling the complexities of your project may be as easy as consulting your local yellow pages under the heading of General Contractors. This method can prove to be hit-or-miss depending on the size of the city or town and the number of general contractors in the area. The best way of finding a contractor is to talk with the owners of other projects similar to yours. A contractor who mainly does additions on homes may have the skills to complete the renovation of your project, but may not have the manpower or commercial sub-contractor network base to handle the project. Similarly, a large general contractor who builds office buildings and other large structures may not be interested in handling a small project such as the renovation of a PraiseBuilding. In larger cities, there may be larger general contractor firms that regularly build and renovate PraiseBuildings. If such contractors exist near the metropolitan area of the PraiseBuilding, it is worth inviting them to bid on the PraiseBuilding project since they may bring vast experience and ...

HOW TO HIRE AN ARCHITECT

Architects, like many other licensed professionals, must pass a comprehensive state test and are permitted to practice architecture only in those states where a valid license is held. Only a person possessing a valid state license and current registration may legally use the title “architect” and provide architectural services. Many architects are members of the American Institute of Architects, a national professional organization. Only those members in good standing may use AIA after their name to denote membership in this organization. Architecture is such a vast and complex discipline that not all architects have the knowledge or skills required to design a PraiseBuilding. An architect, who has only designed new homes or tenant fit-out projects for office buildings, simply will not have the technical knowledge and hands-on expertise to complete a PraiseBuilding without a substantial learning curve. When selecting an architect, it is important to interview several experienced in working with congregations and renovating existing structures. You may be able to obtain names and numbers of qualified professionals by contacting your local AIA Chapter. Ask members of other congregations if they might ...

Before You Build - Six Things You Should Know

Staff Writer, Arks Incorporated  In church building programs you can solve issues one of two ways…invest a little sweat equity or throw money at it and make it someone else`s problem. Good stewardship would lead us to try to get the most of every one of God`s dollars. A dollar saved in the building program is a dollar that can be used in evangelizing the lost and building up God`s people. There are many areas in a building program where the church can save thousands of dollars by being a good steward. Three of the largest potential areas of savings are in site selection, architecture and construction. Contact us to learn how we have helped other churches save tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in their building programs. It`s harder than it looks From concept to completion, your church will not undertake a more demanding and complicated task in terms of money, risk, & effort than it will in a building program. The proof in this can be found in the number of Pastors that leave churches, or even the ministry, ...

CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS SCHEDULE

Before a professional progress manager will begin a major construction project, one of the first steps to be undertaken is the creation of a Construction Progress Schedule. The importance of establishing a progress schedule can be seen in the saved hours of labor, reduction of construction conflicts by overlapping trades and avoidance of delays in the delivery of long lead items. How does one establish a progress schedule? The first step is to make a list of every trade (sub-contractor and vendor) and when they are scheduled to begin their work. Next, record the scope of work to be completed, as well as the number of days the work will take to be completed. It is important to note two points. First, if one sub-contractor must complete a specific task or line item before another trade can begin their work, the first contractor must be scheduled with ample time to complete their task.  Secondly, if an item such as specialty windows, pews or custom seating, custom dyed carpeting, artwork or other items scheduled to take many weeks or months for fabrication and ...

CONTRACTS

What is a “Contract”? A contract is defined as a set of promises. In order to be enforceable, all contracts must contain the following elements:¨ There must be an agreement between the parties, “a meeting of the minds” on the subject matter of the contract. ¨ The subject matter must be lawful. ¨ There must be sufficient consideration. ¨ All parties must have the legal capacity to contract and there must be compliance with legal requirements regarding the form of contract. A construction contract must be in writing to be enforceable. A construction contract is divided into five sections: Section One - The parties to the contract : each party to the contract is listed. Section Two - The scope of work - the entire scope of work must be listed in this section. On major projects, a separate book with the written scope of work and the accompanying blue prints will be included as an attachment detailing the scope of work and will be listed as an exhibit to the contract. Section Three - The cost - This section should include the cost of the work ...

Building Begins with Vision

Said another way, vision and mission are the starting point and direction for your efforts and will be the lens through which many future decisions must be examined. The vision of the church is a defining factor in many things: property size, location, building form and function being just a few. Before building, you need unity in the body with regard to the vision and mission of the church. Without unity in the vision and mission, you will not have unity in the myriad of decisions that make up your building program. Once you have congregation unity in the vision and mission of the church, the other defining decisions concerning function and esthetics now have an objective standard by which they can be evaluated...by deciding which alternative best supports the church vision and mission. Somewhere in the vision and mission statements, it will be helpful to provide an indication of the eventual size of church and the ministry focus. "Winning the world for Christ" is a lofty vision, but one that lacks any detail about how you might do this. Consider this vision statement: "Winning the lost in our community through evangelism ...

Why Plan?

Let me begin by saying that the Church today is in a very difficult situation. Trying to organize the construction of a new building is no doubt a situation in which you have little ongoing experience. This fact alone would not be so bad, except for the fact that the construction industry is continually changing, and is difficult to keep up with, especially for those not involved in it on a daily basis. Some people may argue that it is best for the Church to hire someone (for example an Architect) to do all the planning. These people may feel that planning is not the job of the church. There are however four great reasons for you, the Church, to do some planning on your own before you go out and hire someone to facilitate the design your new church; #1 - PLANNING SAVES YOU MONEY! Your ultimate cost is reduced greatly with effective pre-planning. This is ultimately a service of good stewardship for that which God has granted to you. #2 – PLANNING REMOVES THE OBSTACLES! Isaiah 57:14 tells us ...

Staying Focused During a Building Campaign

“This church is very active and growing, so we`re just about out of space.” (I can see that.) “We`ll need to build soon . . .” (Uh-oh.)  “. . . for the preschool we`re starting, our expanding Sunday school, a bigger sanctuary, and a gym. We really need a gym!” To these expressions of enthusiasm, my standard response would be a noncommittal “When the time is right.” I could clearly see what more square footage could do for our ministry, but I wasn`t ready to trade my robe and commentaries for blueprints and a nail apron. (I confess, however, that I once caught myself dreaming of a day 50 years hence when a grandmother would say, “Yes, child, that`s the magnificent building Pastor Berube led us to put up when I was your age.”) I`d heard stories from other pastors about out-of-control building projects that diverted energy and distracted their congregations from ministry. I could see how easily that might happen—we weren`t even seriously discussing building plans and I was already distracted. So I started a file for ideas, and we began a long journey that resulted in a positive building experience five years ...

Building Committee Checklist

__ What is the structural condition of the building? __ What is the condition of the roof, windows, doors and walls? __ What is the condition of the major systems of the structure? __ Are HVAC, electrical, sprinkler, alarm and plumbing systems in good working order? __ What repairs need to be made to each of these? __ How many people will the building be able to hold according to fire code? __ How many people will the sanctuary hold? __ What will it cost to renovate the building? __ Can the building be designed to contain the various classrooms, offices, worship spaces and meeting spaces included on the building committee's wish list? __ Will the PraiseBuilding complex be able to park all the members' cars on site? Stephen Ferrandi is the Director of KLNB Religious Properties, a real estate firm serving religioius clients in Maryland, D.C., Pennsylvania, and Virginia. He is one of the top experts in land development in the region. Mr. Ferrandi frequently contributes real estate related articles to both print and online publications.

Master Planning

We need a master plan that will facilitate the ministry. Site Capacity Begin by determining the maximum capacity of the site. If all the land can be used (no wetlands or elevations that cannot be developed), we can usually plan on 100 people per acre for church use, not including the major sports areas needed for a Christian school. If there are reasonable setbacks and land coverage criteria (some codes limit the amount of building or impervious development) and sanitary sewer are available, this guideline of 100 people per acre should provide some recreation area. Landscaping and greenbelts may also utilize a significant portion of the site. The configuration of the land is another factor; a triangular site with building setbacks and perimeter greenbelts has less usable land. A rectangular or a square site is best. Ministry Plan Will the church schedule multiple sessions of worship and/or Sunday school? Or do we prefer a single service format? We must provide adequate assimilation spaces (education, fellowship, administration)—based on your ministry philosophy—to facilitate the number of people who can be assembled for worship. The space distribution must also correspond to age ...

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